News In 5 Minutes

News When You Want It

Sunny Hostin Helps BLM Co-Founder Reject 'Unfair' Conservative Criticism Over Group's Own Beliefs



Black Lives Matter has been trying to clean up its image after months of rioting, by scrubbing the group’s radical beliefs from its own website, and pretending like conservatives are crackpots for pointing out their leaders own words.

The View co-host Sunny Hostin was all too happy to assist in this endeavor on Tuesday’s show while speaking to the co-founder, Alicia Garza.

Hostin set up her exchange as if she was going to actually ask a critical question of Garza’s group. Instead, she used the opportunity to dismiss conservative criticism as “unfair” and insane: 

…[5]5% of Americans say they support Black lives Matter. So it is a majority feeling now. But the movement has faced criticism from this administration, from Trump, and other conservatives. They call it a Marxist and terrorist organization that wants to tear down the fabric of America and destroy the nuclear family. You stepped away from the day to day operations of Black Lives Matter, the organization, over three years ago. But tell me, how do you respond to criticism like that which just seems totally off the wall and just unfair in my view? 

 

 

Garza didn’t directly deny the fact that she and co-founder Patrisse Cullors have called themselves “trained Marxists,” or that their website proudly touted how one of the group’s goals is to dismantle the nuclear family (which they recently scrubbed from their website.) Instead, she called conservatives highlighting the founders’ and group’s own words, “stories” and “attacks.” She blamed President Trump for putting her family and friends at risk with his “lies and misinformation”:

…[F]or everybody here who is watching and for each of you, I think each of you know deeply what it feels like to have stories told about you without you…You know, I basically think that, you know, we’re in a political moment where this president and this administration pedals in lies and misinformation and disinformation. I talk in my book about how stories like this do matter. They shape people’s perceptions, opinions, but most of all they shape people’s actions. Unfortunately these kinds of stories have certainly put my family at risk. They put me at risk and luckily–and for many activists around the country. It’s not just myself. Luckily what I also know is anything that gets that much attention, anything that’s being attacked directly in that kind of way must be doing something right…

There was no push back or clarification from the hosts at this response. Why would there be? The gaslighting View hosts said basically the same thing not long ago, actually claiming that BLM violence was “manufactured” by Trump after two police officers were ambushed in a violent attack.

Tell The View’s advertisers Humana and CarShield that you don’t support radical leftists or the media who protect them from scrutiny by contacting them at the links provided or the Conservatives Fight Back page. 

Read the transcript below:

The View

10/20/20

SUNNY HOSTIN: Alicia, I’m so happy you’re here today. I read your book in a day. It’s absolutely fantastic. I do believe it’s going to be a guide for organizers going forward and especially young people. 55% of Americans say they support Black lives Matter. So it is a majority feeling now. But the movement has faced criticism from this administration, from Trump, and other conservatives. They call it a Marxist and terrorist organization that wants to tear down the fabric of America and destroy the nuclear family. You stepped away from the day to day operations of Black Lives Matter, the organization, over three years ago. But tell me, how do you respond to criticism like that which just seems totally off the wall and just unfair in my view? 

ALICIA GARZA: Well, you know, this is now the second election cycle where Black Lives Matter has been used as a political football. 

For everybody here who is watching and for each of you, I think each of you know deeply what it feels like to have stories told about you without you. And for me, this book was a cathartic process. I thought this book was going to be about Black Lives Matter and the origins of the movement. It actually didn’t turn out that way at all. This book when I started writing it, the first story I told was about my mother who taught me everything about what it means to be a strong black woman in this society, a society that depends on black women to survive, but doesn’t value black women and our contributions. You know, I basically think that, you know, we’re in a political moment where this president and this administration pedals in lies and misinformation and disinformation. I talk in my book about how stories like this do matter. They shape people’s perceptions, opinions, but most of all they shape people’s actions. Unfortunately these kinds of stories have certainly put my family at risk. They put me at risk and luckily–and for many activists around the country. It’s not just myself. Luckily what I also know is anything that gets that much attention, anything that’s being attacked directly in that kind of way must be doing something right. So for me I’m just keeping on and I’m continuing to push. I mean, I’m a black woman in America. I know what it means to be maligned and misaligned. Fortunately for us, I take it as inspiration to get going and keep growing. Everybody who is part of this movement knows what we’re about and what we stand for. This book is really my opportunity to say from my own mouth what I stand for and how I got here.



Source link