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New HBO Series 'We Are Who We Are:' Transgenderism Is a 'F***ing Revolution'



This fall HBO premiered the new series We Are Who We Are, directed by Luca Guadagnino who previously directed the pederasty film Call Me By Your Name, which romanticized a sexual relationship between an adult man and a teenaged boy. 

We Are Who We Are follows the life of 14-year-old Fraser (Jack Dylan Grazer), a Milo Yiannopoulos look-alike who is being raised by two lesbian mothers. The women are in the U.S. Army and move to a military base in Italy.

Fraser’s biological mother within the lesbian pair is a disturbed and domineering woman. She routinely behaves in sexually inappropriate ways with her son.

Fraser hates his mother and, deprived of a healthy home life, is struggling to find himself. In that sense, he is the perfect target for the transgender ideology. He reads the poetry of Ocean Vuong, who focuses on popular left-wing LGBTQIA themes.

Fraser befriends Caitlin (Jordan Kristine Seamón), who has both a mom and a dad. Her relationship with her mother is conflicted, but she adores her father.

In this week’s episode, “Right Here, Right Now,” on Monday, September 28, Fraser shows Caitlin transgender influencers on the internet.

 Caitlin: Why do you follow this? 

Fraser: ‘Cause I’m in the present and I try to support the universal freedom. 

Caitlin: Is it the hormones that do that? Wow.

Fraser: Well, it’s hormones plus genetics. 

Caitlin: So transgender is, like, you change your name, change your face and your body, everything. You go from female.

Fraser: No! We were told for ages that we were either males or females, okay? And that was that. Males would do certain things and females would do certain things, end of story. Transgender means that you can– you can just– you can cut that bullshit, and-and instead, you say, you know what? It’s not that simple. It’s not even binary. You get it?

Caitlin: I’m not sure.

Fraser: You know what a fever is?

Caitlin: Sure. 

Fraser: But it’s like a symptom, right? Right? It– it’s… A fever is a symptom that your body is sick. 

Caitlin: You’re telling me my body’s sick?

Fraser: No! I’m telling you that– It’s like a fever. It is, but it isn’t. It’s like a symptom and if you pay attention, you discover real life. It’s a fucking revolution going on inside of you. 

It is hard to make sense of much of Fraser’s gobbledy-gook. “I’m in the present and try to support the universal freedom” sounds like it could have been mumbled by Timothy Leary in the sixties while high on LSD. 

“You discover real life. It’s a fucking revolution going on inside of you.” Yes, hormonal changes can feel like a bodily “revolution” to an adolescent experiencing it. And with a healthy home life and loving parents a teen can successfully navigate those changes in accord with the chromosomes with which they were born. Fraser does not have that stable and loving home life. He has no father-figure. So he is trying to understand the bodily self through transgender internet influencers.

In this sense, this HBO show, intentionally or unintentionally, gets certain truths right. A sensitive adolescent without an anchor can easily fall prey to the contemporary lies of the gender dystopian fad. 

What direction this series takes in future episodes is hard to say. Being set on an American Army base, it has ugly moments that portray American soldiers in a nasty and disparaging light. (One soldier in an earlier episode is casually heard in the background laughing about a rape. A soldier in this episode needlessly starts a fight with an Italian.) Since the series is helmed by a left-wing Hollywood director, we can presume the anti-American military moments will continue throughout future episodes.

Through Fraser’s dialogue, the series is showcasing an agenda designed to “break the binary” and “smash heteronormativity.” But by placing those words in the mouth of a suffering adolescent deprived of healthy boundaries from the adults around him, it reveals far darker truths about that agenda than it realizes.



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