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BIGOTS: ABC Pushes Vile Fake Claim Barrett Christian Group Inspired Handmaid’s Tale



On Thursday, ABC’s Good Morning America tried to preemptively slander potential Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett by pushing the false claim that a Christian group she belonged to was the inspiration for the authoritarian theocracy depicted in the far-left fantasy, The Handmaid’s Tale. The vile segment also touted the pro-abortion lobby attacking the “devout Catholic” federal judge.

At the top of the 7:30 a.m. ET half hour report, correspondent Tom Llamas warned: “With a Senate confirmation, the scales on the Supreme Court will tip 6 to 3 in the conservatives’ favor. And the White House is signaling right now, as far as the nominees are concerned, the more conservative, the better.” Moments later, he noted that “Barrett is the apparent frontrunner,” labeling her a “devout Catholic” who is “is supported by religious conservatives and anti-abortion activists.”

 

 

After touting a clip of Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein attacking Barrett’s faith during a 2017 Senate confirmation hearing by declaring “The dogma lives loudly within you,” Llamas channeled the fears of left-wing groups like Planned Parenthood, which was founded on racism and eugenics:

Pro-choice groups have raised concerns over how Barrett would vote on abortion issues. Planned Parenthood condemned the judge’s nomination to the federal bench. Since she was appointed, she hasn’t issued a ruling on abortion and hasn’t questioned Roe v. Wade’s overall precedent, but critics say she’s sided against rulings that strike down restrictions on abortions.

Beyond the usual leftist wailing about abortion, Llamas went on to push a vile assertion that he knew was fake:

Also under the microscope, Barrett’s link to a small charismatic Christian community called People of Praise….According to its website, “many of its members choose to make a lifetime commitment to the community – a covenant.” Members are assigned a personal adviser. Men were called “heads” and women were called “handmaids.” But those titles since changed to “leaders,” amid speculation the group may have inspired the novel and Emmy-award winning drama The Handmaid’s Tale.

After hyping the made-up smear, he then admitted that it wasn’t true: “But author Margaret Atwood saying that’s not accurate, telling ABC News there were several inspirations.”

Despite that, Llamas still tried leave the door open to the possibility: “But because her notes are locked in a closed library due to COVID, quote, ‘I hesitate to say anything specific for the major influences on the book, I certainly did not confine myself to one sect or group. So I don’t think this is a thread can be legitimately used in this way.’”

He then briefly noted: “People of Praise insisting they did not inspire Atwood’s story and that the organization ‘does not take positions on political matters, legislation, or constitutional interpretation.’”

Sadly, ABC is only the latest media organization to push this disgusting and bigoted fake news.

As much as Democratic Party hacks in the press love to pretend that pro-abortion politicians like Nancy Pelosi and Joe Biden are “devout Catholics,” when it comes to conservatives, that term suddenly becomes a cudgel to bash people who actually take their faith seriously.  

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Here is a full transcript of the September 24 segment:

7:34 AM ET

TOM LLAMAS: We’ll get the latest now on the celebration of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the battle underway to fill her seat. That’s a live look at the Supreme Court right now, where mourners have gathered for days to honor the judge, who was a champion of equality and women’s rights. As the President closes in on his pick to replace her, five women are on his short list, the announcement comes Saturday. And our chief national affairs correspondent Tom Llamas is at Trump Tower in Manhattan with a look at the leading contender. Good morning, Tom.

TOM LLAMAS: George, good morning to you. Whether he wins or loses in November, the decision President Trump announces on Saturday could impact generations of Americans. With a Senate confirmation, the scales on the Supreme Court will tip 6 to 3 in the conservatives’ favor. And the White House is signaling right now, as far as the nominees are concerned, the more conservative, the better.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Supreme Court Showdown; Who Are the Frontrunners to Fill Ginsburg’s Seat?]

This morning, as President Trump gets closer to selecting his Supreme Court nominee…

DONALD TRUMP: The person I’ll be putting up is highly qualified, totally brilliant, top of the line academic student, the highest credentials.

LLAMAS: The two top contenders now in the spotlight. Sources say it’s down to federal judges Amy Coney Barrett and Barbara Lagoa, and that Barrett is the apparent frontrunner. A devout Catholic who clerked for the conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, Barrett is supported by religious conservatives and anti-abortion activists. Her faith, and how it could affect her interpretation of the law, among the issues raised during her 2017 Senate confirmation hearing for the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals.

DIANNE FEINSTEIN [D-CA]: The dogma lives loudly within you, and that’s of concern.

AMY CONEY BARRETT: It’s never appropriate for a judge to impose that judge’s personal convictions, whether they derive from faith or anywhere else, on the law.

LLAMAS: The 48-year-old New Orleans native, who’s a law professor at Notre Dame and mother of seven, explaining her stance in a speech to Hillsdale College last year.

BARRETT: But that’s not a challenge just for religious people. I mean, that’s a challenge for everyone. And so I think it’s a dangerous road to go down to say that only religious people would not be able to separate out moral convictions from their duty.

LLAMAS: Pro-choice groups have raised concerns over how Barrett would vote on abortion issues. Planned Parenthood condemned the judge’s nomination to the federal bench. Since she was appointed, she hasn’t issued a ruling on abortion and hasn’t questioned Roe v. Wade’s overall precedent, but critics say she’s sided against rulings that strike down restrictions on abortions.

Also under the microscope, Barrett’s link to a small charismatic Christian community called People of Praise. The group telling ABC News it will neither confirm nor deny if Barrett is a current member, but she was listed as a former board of trustees member at the organization’s Trinity school from 2015 to 2017 and has been named and photographed in since-deleted online versions of the organization’s magazine.

According to its website, “many of its members choose to make a lifetime commitment to the community – a covenant.” Members are assigned a personal adviser. Men were called “heads” and women were called “handmaids.” But those titles since changed to “leaders,” amid speculation the group may have inspired the novel and Emmy-award winning drama The Handmaid’s Tale.

ELIZABETH MOSS [THE HANDMAID’S TALE]: Is this what freedom looks like?

LLAMAS: But author Margaret Atwood saying that’s not accurate, telling ABC News there were several inspirations. But because her notes are locked in a closed library due to COVID, quote, “I hesitate to say anything specific for the major influences on the book, I certainly did not confine myself to one sect or group. So I don’t think this is a thread can be legitimately used in this way.”

People of Praise insisting they did not inspire Atwood’s story and that the organization “does not take positions on political matters, legislation, or constitutional interpretation.”

LLAMAS: Now as for federal judge Barbara Lagoa, who we mentioned at the top of the story, she’s a Cuban-American from south Florida. But in a sign that this may not break her way, President Trump said she’s on the list, but he has no plans to meet with her. George, as you mentioned, the President said he has five women on his list and they are, quote, “outstanding.” George?

STEPHANOPOULOS: Right, that was a switch, that he’s not meeting with her now. Okay, Tom, thanks very much.



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